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Timex Ironman Triathlon   Speed Distance System


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The Danolite, a helmet mounted cycling light.
Danolite: Cycling Light
Features:
  • Light weight
  • Minimalist
  • Provides Illumination
  • Batteries and Charger included
Reviewed by SPDrecrd

Overall out of 10: 8
Illumination out of 10: 9
Fit n' Finish out of 10: 7

Danolite is a lightweight, pocket sized, battery operated bike light. Dan Surkis produced this light system when he realized that he could improve upon existing systems while utilizing "off the shelf" components. He felt that he could build a lighter and brighter light for cyclists. The minimalist light weighs in at a scant 18 grams, plus the weight of the four "AA" rechargeables (Included) that power it. This certainly puts it in the running as the lightest bike light.

To look at the Danolite, one sees that it is clearly a new product, fresh to the market. It has the simplistic appearance of a prototype and yet, it works very well. One can imagine that as the Danolite gets more established refinements will be made. But, until that time, it remains a very functional, very bright lighting system that can be mounted nearly anywhere. The Danolite comes with a velcro strap for helmet mounting, and a piece of "EZ Pass Velcro" for mounting it in other places. Both methods seem to work without fail or slipage. Both the lighting system and the mounting methods are very low-tech but, often simplicity makes for greater functionality. This is one of those cases. A light doesn't need to be high tech, it just needs to be reliable and to consistently provide illumination. Under the rigors of our testing, the Danolite has thus far done just that.

The Danolite, a helmet mounted cycling light.

For our tests we helmet mounted the Danolite. This gave us the ability to spotlight the areas that were directly in the line of sight. The on-the-helmet mounting of the light means that the light follows the movement of your head. It simply points where you look. The great thing about this is that it gives you the ability to jack light on-coming traffic to make sure that they are aware of your presence. This comes in very handy at intersections where vehicles are turning across traffic and you. The Danolite's small bulb throws an ample beam of intense light that not only gives you decent sight distance but also adequately heralds your presence to those you're sharing the road with. On one particular morning, a few days before day-light savings time, I rode out at 5:30am . It was pitch black for most of my ride. I bolted the last mile in a finish line sprint. Upon returning to my block, one of my neighbors was out walking her dog as I roared toward home. She greeted me as I skidded to a halt at my driveway. She exclaimed, "That's a cool light, I saw you from the end of the block! It was the first thing I noticed."

What did I think overall? Good solid light that throws bright, intense illumination. Could use a bit of refinement, it's definitely rough and ready. But, I can definitely see Danolite clawing some market share from bigger players.

For more details, check out:
::www.danolite.com::

The Danolite, a helmet mounted cycling light.
Danolite: Cycling Light
Features:
  • Light weight
  • Minimalist
  • Provides Illumination
  • Batteries and Charger included
Reviewed by SPDrecrd

Overall out of 10: 8
Illumination out of 10: 9
Fit n' Finish out of 10: 7

Danolite is a lightweight, pocket sized, battery operated bike light. Dan Surkis produced this light system when he realized that he could improve upon existing systems while utilizing "off the shelf" components. He felt that he could build a lighter and brighter light for cyclists. The minimalist light weighs in at a scant 18 grams, plus the weight of the four "AA" rechargeables (Included) that power it. This certainly puts it in the running as the lightest bike light.

To look at the Danolite, one sees that it is clearly a new product, fresh to the market. It has the simplistic appearance of a prototype and yet, it works very well. One can imagine that as the Danolite gets more established refinements will be made. But, until that time, it remains a very functional, very bright lighting system that can be mounted nearly anywhere. The Danolite comes with a velcro strap for helmet mounting, and a piece of "EZ Pass Velcro" for mounting it in other places. Both methods seem to work without fail or slipage. Both the lighting system and the mounting methods are very low-tech but, often simplicity makes for greater functionality. This is one of those cases. A light doesn't need to be high tech, it just needs to be reliable and to consistently provide illumination. Under the rigors of our testing, the Danolite has thus far done just that.

The Danolite, a helmet mounted cycling light.

For our tests we helmet mounted the Danolite. This gave us the ability to spotlight the areas that were directly in the line of sight. The on-the-helmet mounting of the light means that the light follows the movement of your head. It simply points where you look. The great thing about this is that it gives you the ability to jack light on-coming traffic to make sure that they are aware of your presence. This comes in very handy at intersections where vehicles are turning across traffic and you. The Danolite's small bulb throws an ample beam of intense light that not only gives you decent sight distance but also adequately heralds your presence to those you're sharing the road with. On one particular morning, a few days before day-light savings time, I rode out at 5:30am . It was pitch black for most of my ride. I bolted the last mile in a finish line sprint. Upon returning to my block, one of my neighbors was out walking her dog as I roared toward home. She greeted me as I skidded to a halt at my driveway. She exclaimed, "That's a cool light, I saw you from the end of the block! It was the first thing I noticed."

What did I think overall? Good solid light that throws bright, intense illumination. Could use a bit of refinement, it's definitely rough and ready. But, I can definitely see Danolite clawing some market share from bigger players.

For more details, check out:
::www.danolite.com::

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