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Sea Otter 2008
Day Two
Genghis Kahn Video
Intro Day One
Choose Life Video

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Tara Llanes:
Determined to Recover
Finding your Green Self


New Feature:
Map your Rides!


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Cross Nationals
45 Minutes
Win or Lose
Gale Force Cross
Elements of Cross


Photos
Videos


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Got Pink?
Speaking With:
Magnus Bäckstedt
Wounded Warrior Project:
Phoenix to Vegas
Grow Your Own Bike?
Young Mechanics
Speaking with:
Shonny Vanlandingham
Stories From the Road:
The Spinning Stars


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Interbike
Faces on the Mountain
Cross Vegas
The Showroom Floor
A Cycling Shambhala
BMC FourStroke 03
Rock & Roll Lives at Defeet
Demo Days
WTB MX Prowler Review
Interbike 2007 Intro


Photos
Videos


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Junior Development
Voices:
Benny and Christian Zenga

Green Choices
On the Soldier Ride
The Jury is Still out...



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Pedros
Faces of Pedros
Lea Davison Teaches
Kids to MTB

Women's Skills by
Alison Dunlap

Coming alive
Going Green



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Voices: Reginald Harkema
Bike The World: New York
Team Trips For Kids
The Ironclad Triathlon
The Ride of Silence
Ladies Night at R-A-B
Bike the World
Bike Polo
Get Your Friends to Ride!



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Sea Otter
Grand Theft Velo
In the Heart and Mind
of the Beast

It's All About the Wheels
A sense of Paradox
Sea Otter: Super D
What is Sea Otter?



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Which Holiday Treat
Are You?

Raisin a Comeback
Marilyn Price:
Making Trips for Kids




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2006 CX Nationals Sidelines
2006 CX Nationals Day 2
2006 CX Nationals Day I
2006 CX Nationals Intro



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Warmth Recaptured
The Road Ahead
On The Well Worn Path
Fireflies in the
Garden of Gray

A Ride With the Cannibal
Hoop Talk



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Interbike '06
Grande Finale
Innocence Lost
Outdoor Demo
and Hangover Ride

Interbike 2006 Intro



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24 Hours of Willamette
Twilight at the Velodrome



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Pedros Fest '06
The Faces of Pedros
Not-so Still of the Night
The Bold and The Vulgar
Trailing Off
Stickers, Glue, Ribbons,
Markers

Good Times in the Sky
Downhiller Hunting at Jiminy
Pedros Fest Intro 2006



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Heart Rate Monitor
Mt. Hamilton
Critical Mass
The Mountain of the Devil
Fighting for the Finish
Hey Watch Your Feet!
Special Film Pull-out
Bicycle Film Festival
Tour du Parc
The Five Boro Bike Tour
VOICES: Peter Sutherland
VOICES: Brendt Barbur
VOICES: Jacob Septimus
Stillwell Interpretive Trail
Resurrecting the Vanderbilt
Motor Parkway

Kicking it up a Notch
Bicycle Film Festival Intro
The Fat Tire Classic
The Road to Zamora
Edison, NJ Show
Carlisle, PA Show
Bike Show Intro
SLIME Torture Test
Step Away from the Lube
Energy Crisis
CX Camp for Juniors
Gear Guide: 2006
Inside the CX Nationals
Road to Nowhere
Take it Hard, Take it Easy
Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Three

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Two

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day One

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Intro

Holiday GIFT GUIDE
The Unbearable Art
of Wrenching

Tasting the Brew
A Crewman's journey
275 Miles for Youth
Letters from the Road
Patterson Pass Insurgence
The Power of Critical Mass



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Travel:



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Interbike '05/ Las Vegas
IB '05: Red Rocks Canyon
IB '05: Indoor Expo
IB '05: Lake Mead
IB '05: Outdoor Demo II
IB '05: Outdoor Demo I
IB '05: Intro



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Pedros Fest '05
Night Moves
Roughin' It!
Words With Tinker Juarez
Pedros' Faces
Jiminy Peak Free Ride
Womens' Skills Clinic
Pedros: Day One
Pedros Intro



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Chicago
Bicyclist Haven?
What's Not to Bike?
Sites @ Night



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West Coast
Cali Travel Intro
Hitting the Wall
Lake Chabot
Tour de Truckee
Ride to Skyline



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Tarmac Tacos
The New York Bike Show
The Deluge Ride
New Jersey Bike Show
Stinging the Rio
Roaring Mouse Race Series
(Spring 2005)

The Agony and Ecstacy
of Icy Rain...

Visions in Saffron
Margo Conover Speaks Out
Repurposing
The Blizzard Ride
PBBC 2005 Season Opener
26 Degrees of Separation
The Abondoned Bike
Bite My Style:
Messenger Fashion




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Death Valley:
Two Cyclists Enter

Car-Free: Kara
Car-Free: Max
And the Winner is...
Halloween in Gotham
Battling El Diablo
Interbike: The Event
Interbike: Intro
Cape May,
A Cyclist's Dream

A d'Liteful Adventure
Catching up with
the Catskill Wheelmen

BTC Daily 2004
Crashpads:
Crash and Burn?

IBEX MTB Trail [Series]
Prelude to a Champion
Rudy Project: Part Deux
Take Time to Appreciate
Stretching for a Fit Body
A Soggy 5 Island Tour
Incident Report
The Pump Showdown
Manhattan Greenway
Burley D'Lite Pre-Review
Bike Rodeo
When Polar Bears Attack
Almighty Leap Ride
Essential Cycling Toolkit
Training up! [The Series]
Selle Italia/Cannondale Ride
Wanna do a charity ride?
PBBC 2003 Season Opener
Rudy Project Eval Ride
Fixing Flats On the Go!
The Ride Dine 9.13.03
Road Riding Safety
Winter Riding Safety
Cycles Le Femme Jerseys
Helmets and Safety
Grow Your Own Bike: Can a bike made from Bamboo end poverty in the world? Ask David Ho!

There are those amongst us who talk, and those of who do. The later being those who actually make changes and enable progress, the ones who with ideas, change the lives of others. David Ho is one of those people. He is a quiet mannered gentleman with a passion for science, cycling and... oh yeah, saving the planet along with its people. Slacker... David Ho may not have set out to save the world, but he may have made a giant step in that direction.

David Ho doing some field research in Marin County

Although David had been riding mountain bicycles for years, it wasn't until he picked up a beater road bike to make getting to work easier that he became a true devotee. After obtaining his Ph. D., he began work as an Oceanographer at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO).

David Ho locks up his bike near NYC’s 6th Avenue. Which makes for a busy back drop for conversations about a lifestyle that is worlds away over in Africa.

Out of school and still gripped with a passion for cycling, he decided to buy a better road bike. It was while going through the process of selecting a bike that he came across Craig Calfee, who is known for his hand-built carbon fiber creations. Craig, it seemed, was a master of unusual materials for bicycles, one of which was bamboo.

Calfee's website posed the following challenge: "If you have an interest in a project involving bamboo bikes in developing countries, we have something for you! Are you a good grant application writer? Or would you like to fund this one yourself?"

Craig Calfee speaks with a resident in the Millennium Village and explains how he’ll be able to build his own bike.

Reading that challenge planted the germ of an idea in David's head. Investigating further, he found that Calfee believed it possible to build bicycles using native growing bamboo in developing third world countries. Beyond that he also believed it possible to teach the indigenous people to build the bicycles themselves out of this plentiful, eco-friendly, renewable resource. The advantage of the raw material was its plentiful, free availability and, it had already been proven as a strong and effective frame building material. Additionally, accessing the raw material would not require any industrialization or a transportation infrastructure, as would steel, aluminum, or any other more traditional frame material. Non-industrialized populations would be able to build their own transportation systems using locally available, natural, virtually free, material.

Benefits of Bamboo: Incredibly strong material with great ride characteristics. As a member of the grass family it can return to a harvestable production level is less time then most trees. Can be easily grown at a much lower cost (if not free) in an extremely wide ride of climates

The Earth Institute at Columbia University: The Earth Institute's overarching goal is to help achieve sustainable development primarily by expanding the world’s understanding of Earth as one integrated system. We work toward this goal through scientific research, education and the practical application of research for solving real-world challenges

At just the time when David was considering the idea of bamboo bikes, a grant competition was announced. The Earth Institute at Columbia University was offering seed funding for projects that would further one of their causes, ending poverty in the world. As a research scientist at the LDEO at Columbia University, David was eligible to write a proposal for the competition. David's proposal stated, "Lack of access to effective transportation is a fundamental limiter to employment opportunities, local and regional trade, and public health." He went on to explain how the bicycle, as the simplest and most efficient form of transportation, could remediate these transportation limits. He thought that these bamboo bicycles, built in Africa, could be tested in the Earth Institute's Millennium Villages in various parts of Africa. The people at the Earth Institute saw his vision and a grant for $25,000 was awarded.

The bamboo bike stood out amongst all of the expensive racey high dollar bicycles on the Central Park loop. Ultimately the bamboo bike will have a greater impact on the world.

It may seem a simplistic solution to what appears a complex problem, viewed through the internet from an air conditioned environment. In reality the ability to transport perishable goods to and from market within the margin of that perishability creates the difference between sustainable trade and waste. The bicycle reduces travel time across unpaved trails and gives people access to goods, services, and markets that are effectively inaccessible on foot. It is a simple solution but it is an effective one.

Above: The bike was well received in Ghana. People tested it’s strength to see how much cargo it could carry. Left: David Ho shows off the protoype outside Manhattan’s Central Park.

David Ho and his associates John Mutter, Vijay Modi and Craig Calfee have built a prototype bamboo cargo bike in Ghana, using locally sourced material. They plan to introduce the bamboo bike to the Earth Institute's Millennium Villages in Africa to test its effectiveness, to field test their manufacture, and to explore the possibilities of implementing the bamboo bikes on a large scale. Now all that remains is for the project to grow. What's going to make that happen? Your help...

Millennium Villages: The Millennium Villages project, based at The Earth Institute at Columbia University, is a science-based bottom-up approach to lifting developing country villages out of the poverty trap that afflicts more than a billion people worldwide.

Help make a difference, visit:
www.bamboobike.org

Grow Your Own Bike: Can a bike made from Bamboo end poverty in the world? Ask David Ho!

There are those amongst us who talk, and those of who do. The later being those who actually make changes and enable progress, the ones who with ideas, change the lives of others. David Ho is one of those people. He is a quiet mannered gentleman with a passion for science, cycling and... oh yeah, saving the planet along with its people. Slacker... David Ho may not have set out to save the world, but he may have made a giant step in that direction.

David Ho doing some field research in Marin County

Although David had been riding mountain bicycles for years, it wasn't until he picked up a beater road bike to make getting to work easier that he became a true devotee. After obtaining his Ph. D., he began work as an Oceanographer at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO).

David Ho locks up his bike near NYC’s 6th Avenue. Which makes for a busy back drop for conversations about a lifestyle that is worlds away over in Africa.

Out of school and still gripped with a passion for cycling, he decided to buy a better road bike. It was while going through the process of selecting a bike that he came across Craig Calfee, who is known for his hand-built carbon fiber creations. Craig, it seemed, was a master of unusual materials for bicycles, one of which was bamboo.

Calfee's website posed the following challenge: "If you have an interest in a project involving bamboo bikes in developing countries, we have something for you! Are you a good grant application writer? Or would you like to fund this one yourself?"

Craig Calfee speaks with a resident in the Millennium Village and explains how he’ll be able to build his own bike.

Reading that challenge planted the germ of an idea in David's head. Investigating further, he found that Calfee believed it possible to build bicycles using native growing bamboo in developing third world countries. Beyond that he also believed it possible to teach the indigenous people to build the bicycles themselves out of this plentiful, eco-friendly, renewable resource. The advantage of the raw material was its plentiful, free availability and, it had already been proven as a strong and effective frame building material. Additionally, accessing the raw material would not require any industrialization or a transportation infrastructure, as would steel, aluminum, or any other more traditional frame material. Non-industrialized populations would be able to build their own transportation systems using locally available, natural, virtually free, material.

Benefits of Bamboo: Incredibly strong material with great ride characteristics. As a member of the grass family it can return to a harvestable production level is less time then most trees. Can be easily grown at a much lower cost (if not free) in an extremely wide ride of climates

The Earth Institute at Columbia University: The Earth Institute's overarching goal is to help achieve sustainable development primarily by expanding the world’s understanding of Earth as one integrated system. We work toward this goal through scientific research, education and the practical application of research for solving real-world challenges

At just the time when David was considering the idea of bamboo bikes, a grant competition was announced. The Earth Institute at Columbia University was offering seed funding for projects that would further one of their causes, ending poverty in the world. As a research scientist at the LDEO at Columbia University, David was eligible to write a proposal for the competition. David's proposal stated, "Lack of access to effective transportation is a fundamental limiter to employment opportunities, local and regional trade, and public health." He went on to explain how the bicycle, as the simplest and most efficient form of transportation, could remediate these transportation limits. He thought that these bamboo bicycles, built in Africa, could be tested in the Earth Institute's Millennium Villages in various parts of Africa. The people at the Earth Institute saw his vision and a grant for $25,000 was awarded.

The bamboo bike stood out amongst all of the expensive racey high dollar bicycles on the Central Park loop. Ultimately the bamboo bike will have a greater impact on the world.

It may seem a simplistic solution to what appears a complex problem, viewed through the internet from an air conditioned environment. In reality the ability to transport perishable goods to and from market within the margin of that perishability creates the difference between sustainable trade and waste. The bicycle reduces travel time across unpaved trails and gives people access to goods, services, and markets that are effectively inaccessible on foot. It is a simple solution but it is an effective one.

Above: The bike was well received in Ghana. People tested it’s strength to see how much cargo it could carry. Left: David Ho shows off the protoype outside Manhattan’s Central Park.

David Ho and his associates John Mutter, Vijay Modi and Craig Calfee have built a prototype bamboo cargo bike in Ghana, using locally sourced material. They plan to introduce the bamboo bike to the Earth Institute's Millennium Villages in Africa to test its effectiveness, to field test their manufacture, and to explore the possibilities of implementing the bamboo bikes on a large scale. Now all that remains is for the project to grow. What's going to make that happen? Your help...

Millennium Villages: The Millennium Villages project, based at The Earth Institute at Columbia University, is a science-based bottom-up approach to lifting developing country villages out of the poverty trap that afflicts more than a billion people worldwide.

Help make a difference, visit:
www.bamboobike.org

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