Bicycles | Clothing | Components | Backpacks | Books and Movies | Bottles | Electronics
Glasses | Helmets | Lubes | Nutrition | Pumps | Racks | Safety | Shoes | Skin and Muscle Care | Tools
Trailers | Trainers |Wheels and Tires
Search


rule Archived Articles:
rule


Sea Otter 2008
Day Two
Genghis Kahn Video
Intro Day One
Choose Life Video

rule


Tara Llanes:
Determined to Recover
Finding your Green Self


New Feature:
Map your Rides!


rule


Cross Nationals
45 Minutes
Win or Lose
Gale Force Cross
Elements of Cross


Photos
Videos


rule






rule


Got Pink?
Speaking With:
Magnus Bäckstedt
Wounded Warrior Project:
Phoenix to Vegas
Grow Your Own Bike?
Young Mechanics
Speaking with:
Shonny Vanlandingham
Stories From the Road:
The Spinning Stars


rule


Interbike
Faces on the Mountain
Cross Vegas
The Showroom Floor
A Cycling Shambhala
BMC FourStroke 03
Rock & Roll Lives at Defeet
Demo Days
WTB MX Prowler Review
Interbike 2007 Intro


Photos
Videos


rule


Junior Development
Voices:
Benny and Christian Zenga

Green Choices
On the Soldier Ride
The Jury is Still out...



rule


Pedros
Faces of Pedros
Lea Davison Teaches
Kids to MTB

Women's Skills by
Alison Dunlap

Coming alive
Going Green



rule


Voices: Reginald Harkema
Bike The World: New York
Team Trips For Kids
The Ironclad Triathlon
The Ride of Silence
Ladies Night at R-A-B
Bike the World
Bike Polo
Get Your Friends to Ride!



rule


Sea Otter
Grand Theft Velo
In the Heart and Mind
of the Beast

It's All About the Wheels
A sense of Paradox
Sea Otter: Super D
What is Sea Otter?



rule





rule


Which Holiday Treat
Are You?

Raisin a Comeback
Marilyn Price:
Making Trips for Kids




rule


2006 CX Nationals Sidelines
2006 CX Nationals Day 2
2006 CX Nationals Day I
2006 CX Nationals Intro



rule





rule


Warmth Recaptured
The Road Ahead
On The Well Worn Path
Fireflies in the
Garden of Gray

A Ride With the Cannibal
Hoop Talk



rule


Interbike '06
Grande Finale
Innocence Lost
Outdoor Demo
and Hangover Ride

Interbike 2006 Intro



rule


24 Hours of Willamette
Twilight at the Velodrome



rule


Pedros Fest '06
The Faces of Pedros
Not-so Still of the Night
The Bold and The Vulgar
Trailing Off
Stickers, Glue, Ribbons,
Markers

Good Times in the Sky
Downhiller Hunting at Jiminy
Pedros Fest Intro 2006



rule


Heart Rate Monitor
Mt. Hamilton
Critical Mass
The Mountain of the Devil
Fighting for the Finish
Hey Watch Your Feet!
Special Film Pull-out
Bicycle Film Festival
Tour du Parc
The Five Boro Bike Tour
VOICES: Peter Sutherland
VOICES: Brendt Barbur
VOICES: Jacob Septimus
Stillwell Interpretive Trail
Resurrecting the Vanderbilt
Motor Parkway

Kicking it up a Notch
Bicycle Film Festival Intro
The Fat Tire Classic
The Road to Zamora
Edison, NJ Show
Carlisle, PA Show
Bike Show Intro
SLIME Torture Test
Step Away from the Lube
Energy Crisis
CX Camp for Juniors
Gear Guide: 2006
Inside the CX Nationals
Road to Nowhere
Take it Hard, Take it Easy
Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Three

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Two

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day One

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Intro

Holiday GIFT GUIDE
The Unbearable Art
of Wrenching

Tasting the Brew
A Crewman's journey
275 Miles for Youth
Letters from the Road
Patterson Pass Insurgence
The Power of Critical Mass



rule


Travel:



rule


Interbike '05/ Las Vegas
IB '05: Red Rocks Canyon
IB '05: Indoor Expo
IB '05: Lake Mead
IB '05: Outdoor Demo II
IB '05: Outdoor Demo I
IB '05: Intro



rule


Pedros Fest '05
Night Moves
Roughin' It!
Words With Tinker Juarez
Pedros' Faces
Jiminy Peak Free Ride
Womens' Skills Clinic
Pedros: Day One
Pedros Intro



rule


Chicago
Bicyclist Haven?
What's Not to Bike?
Sites @ Night



rule


West Coast
Cali Travel Intro
Hitting the Wall
Lake Chabot
Tour de Truckee
Ride to Skyline



rule


Tarmac Tacos
The New York Bike Show
The Deluge Ride
New Jersey Bike Show
Stinging the Rio
Roaring Mouse Race Series
(Spring 2005)

The Agony and Ecstacy
of Icy Rain...

Visions in Saffron
Margo Conover Speaks Out
Repurposing
The Blizzard Ride
PBBC 2005 Season Opener
26 Degrees of Separation
The Abondoned Bike
Bite My Style:
Messenger Fashion




rule


Death Valley:
Two Cyclists Enter

Car-Free: Kara
Car-Free: Max
And the Winner is...
Halloween in Gotham
Battling El Diablo
Interbike: The Event
Interbike: Intro
Cape May,
A Cyclist's Dream

A d'Liteful Adventure
Catching up with
the Catskill Wheelmen

BTC Daily 2004
Crashpads:
Crash and Burn?

IBEX MTB Trail [Series]
Prelude to a Champion
Rudy Project: Part Deux
Take Time to Appreciate
Stretching for a Fit Body
A Soggy 5 Island Tour
Incident Report
The Pump Showdown
Manhattan Greenway
Burley D'Lite Pre-Review
Bike Rodeo
When Polar Bears Attack
Almighty Leap Ride
Essential Cycling Toolkit
Training up! [The Series]
Selle Italia/Cannondale Ride
Wanna do a charity ride?
PBBC 2003 Season Opener
Rudy Project Eval Ride
Fixing Flats On the Go!
The Ride Dine 9.13.03
Road Riding Safety
Winter Riding Safety
Cycles Le Femme Jerseys
Helmets and Safety
45 Minutes: A gunshot sends all the fury foward. Then it's an all out melee to get to the finishline in one piece

It was very tempting to pen this article as a simple race report. After all, the highlight of the day was the Men's and Women's Elite class competition, which is comprised of both professional and highly select amateurs. It is the most skilled level of racing under the cyclocross umbrella, crowning a champion is what the Cross Nats are all about. But upon reflection it became apparent that this was merely the easy way out. Race results and reportage are an important aspect of the reporting yes. But, (and this is key) there are about 2,450 Competitors laying it all on the line in this competition and that is really the story.

The key to the nationals is not the race results but the story behind the race and racers.

The first day of the competition was predominantly the Junior competition. Take note that this is a school day in which 335 families chose to bear the expense, take a few days off from work and school, and trek out to Kansas. Riders from 45 states all rallied to participate in a sport that they do for the honor of a medal, or a jersey, but more importantly for the pure love of it. As we returned to the hotel after the final race, we ran across a young competitor from Idaho packing up his gear. He had finished 35th in the men's elite. He had hoped to do better of course, but he told us, "This was the greatest day of my life, I had the opportunity to race on the same track, in the same race with the very best Cross Champions and that's enough." He had the chance to do so enjoying himself every pedal crank, and every step of the way. Now he was packing up his gear and bringing a smile home with him.

The crowd is within reach of the champions

The last day of the Cross Nats was for many a day of relaxation, enjoying a sport that they all love. Gathered around the track it was possible to recognize many of the same faces that raced earlier in the weekend. Now they were back with all the pressure off. The only pressure remaining was that of making as much noise as humanly possible with cow bells, bike pump powered home made air horns, old bike frames beaten on with pipes, or any other fashion of noisemaker. Pressure was on to cheer like hell for their favorite, or possibly a rider they just picked from the crowd, or maybe a rider who was suffering and needed their cheers. The sounds of cowbells and encouragement filled the air. By the time the Elite races went off, the spectators were 3 to 5 deep, surrounding key observation points along the course.

The snow and ice didn't last long. THe track quickly turned treacherous as the riders ground it into mud.

Excitement permeated an already rowdy crowd. Clusters of spectators hovered in the dips near the run ups, a spot that had claimed many a dry kit, the slip was wild and the ruts were just getting deeper and deeper. This is where this weekend's riders chose to congregate. Why? Because they had already been there. As riders made it through, or not, the appropriate Ooohs or Ahh's rose and without seeing, you knew the from the sound how the rider had passed the obstacle - or not.

Chicken Man? Plenty of cowbell? It's all in the mix.

The rubber squeaky chickens came out, a chicken man was making the rounds, Space Ghost made an appearance and Santa even rode the course. What precisely the cartoon characters and farm animals have to do with Cross may escape us, but the energy and the all out visceral enjoyment of laying it all on the line does not.

Mmmmmm, carbs, protein, minerals, Mud...

The track itself had remained as much a chameleon as it had been throughout the event. From the time of the warm ups to the race itself, sections previously frozen were now slushy. Formerly safe traction points, now pitched riders left and right as their bikes shot out from beneath them.

A huge field of riders began the race but, in the end it became a duel between a select few.

There were five big players in the men's elite but it really boiled down to a duel between Tim Johnson, coming off of a phenomenal year of wins, and Johnathan Paige, another highly seeded contender. Ryan Trebon, the defending champion entered the race handicapped by a bout of illness. He was ultimately taken out by a head on collision with a slower competitor.

Must keep focus

Paige began the race with a clear 15 second lead on the rest of the field, but it was soon obvious that Tim Johnson applied lessons learned this year racing on the U.S. Pro Tour. In a classic road strategy, he slowly reeled Paige in. Then he hung back and sitting on Johnathan's wheel, conserving his energy for an all out challenge on the pavement with two to go. He attacked, took the lead and held it. Passing through the pit area Paige hit one of the course stakes and got tangled up in the tape costing him another few precious seconds, sealing his fate.

Agony could be read on each riders' face as they passed

The Elite women's race was a horse of an entirely different color. Held before the men's elite, the course was still a bit more frozen with icy patches that proved dangerous, unseating many of the women. Sudden exits into nearby ice coated trees or hard trips to the ground were common. For the winner and National Champion, Katie Compton, it was written in stone as she shot ahead of the pack and proceeded to ride the course on rails. It was never in question, it was clear that her long season of European racing had honed her razor sharp skills.

Katie Compton (right) was the little engine that couldn't... Couldn't be beat that is. A rider from the Richard Sachs Team (above) dashes against the steps

There you have it, the race report this article had to include. Sure it's about the race, but in the end it is really about the racers, the fans, and the spirit of competition.

The sirens' call of the top podium spot leaves you almost too euphoric to realize what pain you are in

45 Minutes: A gunshot sends all the fury foward. Then it's an all out melee to get to the finishline in one piece

It was very tempting to pen this article as a simple race report. After all, the highlight of the day was the Men's and Women's Elite class competition, which is comprised of both professional and highly select amateurs. It is the most skilled level of racing under the cyclocross umbrella, crowning a champion is what the Cross Nats are all about. But upon reflection it became apparent that this was merely the easy way out. Race results and reportage are an important aspect of the reporting yes. But, (and this is key) there are about 2,450 Competitors laying it all on the line in this competition and that is really the story.

The key to the nationals is not the race results but the story behind the race and racers.

The first day of the competition was predominantly the Junior competition. Take note that this is a school day in which 335 families chose to bear the expense, take a few days off from work and school, and trek out to Kansas. Riders from 45 states all rallied to participate in a sport that they do for the honor of a medal, or a jersey, but more importantly for the pure love of it. As we returned to the hotel after the final race, we ran across a young competitor from Idaho packing up his gear. He had finished 35th in the men's elite. He had hoped to do better of course, but he told us, "This was the greatest day of my life, I had the opportunity to race on the same track, in the same race with the very best Cross Champions and that's enough." He had the chance to do so enjoying himself every pedal crank, and every step of the way. Now he was packing up his gear and bringing a smile home with him.

The crowd is within reach of the champions

The last day of the Cross Nats was for many a day of relaxation, enjoying a sport that they all love. Gathered around the track it was possible to recognize many of the same faces that raced earlier in the weekend. Now they were back with all the pressure off. The only pressure remaining was that of making as much noise as humanly possible with cow bells, bike pump powered home made air horns, old bike frames beaten on with pipes, or any other fashion of noisemaker. Pressure was on to cheer like hell for their favorite, or possibly a rider they just picked from the crowd, or maybe a rider who was suffering and needed their cheers. The sounds of cowbells and encouragement filled the air. By the time the Elite races went off, the spectators were 3 to 5 deep, surrounding key observation points along the course.

The snow and ice didn't last long. THe track quickly turned treacherous as the riders ground it into mud.

Excitement permeated an already rowdy crowd. Clusters of spectators hovered in the dips near the run ups, a spot that had claimed many a dry kit, the slip was wild and the ruts were just getting deeper and deeper. This is where this weekend's riders chose to congregate. Why? Because they had already been there. As riders made it through, or not, the appropriate Ooohs or Ahh's rose and without seeing, you knew the from the sound how the rider had passed the obstacle - or not.

Chicken Man? Plenty of cowbell? It's all in the mix.

The rubber squeaky chickens came out, a chicken man was making the rounds, Space Ghost made an appearance and Santa even rode the course. What precisely the cartoon characters and farm animals have to do with Cross may escape us, but the energy and the all out visceral enjoyment of laying it all on the line does not.

Mmmmmm, carbs, protein, minerals, Mud...

The track itself had remained as much a chameleon as it had been throughout the event. From the time of the warm ups to the race itself, sections previously frozen were now slushy. Formerly safe traction points, now pitched riders left and right as their bikes shot out from beneath them.

A huge field of riders began the race but, in the end it became a duel between a select few.

There were five big players in the men's elite but it really boiled down to a duel between Tim Johnson, coming off of a phenomenal year of wins, and Johnathan Paige, another highly seeded contender. Ryan Trebon, the defending champion entered the race handicapped by a bout of illness. He was ultimately taken out by a head on collision with a slower competitor.

Must keep focus

Paige began the race with a clear 15 second lead on the rest of the field, but it was soon obvious that Tim Johnson applied lessons learned this year racing on the U.S. Pro Tour. In a classic road strategy, he slowly reeled Paige in. Then he hung back and sitting on Johnathan's wheel, conserving his energy for an all out challenge on the pavement with two to go. He attacked, took the lead and held it. Passing through the pit area Paige hit one of the course stakes and got tangled up in the tape costing him another few precious seconds, sealing his fate.

Agony could be read on each riders' face as they passed

The Elite women's race was a horse of an entirely different color. Held before the men's elite, the course was still a bit more frozen with icy patches that proved dangerous, unseating many of the women. Sudden exits into nearby ice coated trees or hard trips to the ground were common. For the winner and National Champion, Katie Compton, it was written in stone as she shot ahead of the pack and proceeded to ride the course on rails. It was never in question, it was clear that her long season of European racing had honed her razor sharp skills.

Katie Compton (right) was the little engine that couldn't... Couldn't be beat that is. A rider from the Richard Sachs Team (above) dashes against the steps

There you have it, the race report this article had to include. Sure it's about the race, but in the end it is really about the racers, the fans, and the spirit of competition.

The sirens' call of the top podium spot leaves you almost too euphoric to realize what pain you are in

Send This Story To a Friend
Your Name:
Friends Email Address:
Your Email Address:
Custom Message:
Banner Ad

Banner Ad