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rule Wheels and Tires:
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DT Swiss 240s Road Wheels
Hutchinson Carbon Comps
Kenda Koncept
M2Racer Ti Skewers
Mavic Ksyrium SSL
Michelin Axial Carbons
Panaracer Cinder 1.95
Shimano Dura Ace 7701
   Wheelset
Vittoria Revolution KXS
Vredestein Fortezza Tricomp
WTB Prowler MX


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Vredestein Fortezza Tricomp
Features:
  1. Clincher technology with tubular ride
  2. Weight: 240 grams
  3. inflate to 150 PSI
  4. TriComp Technology
Vredestein Fortezza Tricomp
click image for larger view

Click here
to buy now!




Reviewed by SPDrecrd

Rating out of 10: 7.8
Price: $36
Purchased at:
PerformanceBike.com

The Forteza Tricomp is Vredestein's premier clincher tire. I put these sneakers on my bike in an effort to improve performance. The Tricomps are intended for both training and racing, so they have a mix of qualities that range from tight handling to a tough skin for decent durability.

The particular characteristic that attracted me to these tires (besides several recommendations) was the fact that they can be inflated up to pressures much higher than most normal clinchers. In theory the higher pressure is supposed to reduce rolling resistance by decreasing the deformation of the tire at the road surface, under the weight of the rider.

When I first took the Tricomps out for a spin, I pumped them up to 145psi, my initial feeling was that the handling was very good and the higher pressure made for an interesting ride quality. The road feel was solid but not jittery or bouncy. There was no additional bob and the new tires took up road imperfections quite well.

One drawback to these tires is there is a feeling of higher rolling resistance. Or at least higher than some tires. This may be due to the grippiness of the material that composes the skin. Of course it is this quality that makes these tires dig in deep and hold corners like a cat climbing a tree to outrun a dog.

On the first climb I attempted, I immediately saw where these tires shine. On a steep climb that requires you to get out of the saddle, you become completely aware of the extra kick in every pedal stroke. The higher pressure in the tires helps to counteract the extra downforce that can deform the tires at the road surface. This helps to reduce the damping effect on forward momentum and the wheel "sogginess" that can be a result of an out-of-the-saddle effort.

Also, in fast descents, the Tricomps are very stable and very quick. Velocity builds quickly while stability and handling remains consistent.

The durability of these tires is my only real complaint. I have about 700 miles on my current set and the rear tire has already had significantly loss of its conical nature. The rear tire may have about 300 miles left in it. If it were to get 1000-1200 miles in its life, I wouldn't be disappointed but I wouldn't be impressed either. The front tire however looks, barely used and could probably go for another 1200 miles. Since I am heavy rider, take all this with a grain of salt.

The color of my set of tires is yellow sidewalls with a tan center line. At first I thought they were kind of silly looking but came to dig them after a while.

Vredestein Fortezza Tricomp
Features:
  1. Clincher technology with tubular ride
  2. Weight: 240 grams
  3. inflate to 150 PSI
  4. TriComp Technology
Vredestein Fortezza Tricomp
click image for larger view

Click here
to buy now!




Reviewed by SPDrecrd

Rating out of 10: 7.8
Price: $36
Purchased at:
PerformanceBike.com

The Forteza Tricomp is Vredestein's premier clincher tire. I put these sneakers on my bike in an effort to improve performance. The Tricomps are intended for both training and racing, so they have a mix of qualities that range from tight handling to a tough skin for decent durability.

The particular characteristic that attracted me to these tires (besides several recommendations) was the fact that they can be inflated up to pressures much higher than most normal clinchers. In theory the higher pressure is supposed to reduce rolling resistance by decreasing the deformation of the tire at the road surface, under the weight of the rider.

When I first took the Tricomps out for a spin, I pumped them up to 145psi, my initial feeling was that the handling was very good and the higher pressure made for an interesting ride quality. The road feel was solid but not jittery or bouncy. There was no additional bob and the new tires took up road imperfections quite well.

One drawback to these tires is there is a feeling of higher rolling resistance. Or at least higher than some tires. This may be due to the grippiness of the material that composes the skin. Of course it is this quality that makes these tires dig in deep and hold corners like a cat climbing a tree to outrun a dog.

On the first climb I attempted, I immediately saw where these tires shine. On a steep climb that requires you to get out of the saddle, you become completely aware of the extra kick in every pedal stroke. The higher pressure in the tires helps to counteract the extra downforce that can deform the tires at the road surface. This helps to reduce the damping effect on forward momentum and the wheel "sogginess" that can be a result of an out-of-the-saddle effort.

Also, in fast descents, the Tricomps are very stable and very quick. Velocity builds quickly while stability and handling remains consistent.

The durability of these tires is my only real complaint. I have about 700 miles on my current set and the rear tire has already had significantly loss of its conical nature. The rear tire may have about 300 miles left in it. If it were to get 1000-1200 miles in its life, I wouldn't be disappointed but I wouldn't be impressed either. The front tire however looks, barely used and could probably go for another 1200 miles. Since I am heavy rider, take all this with a grain of salt.

The color of my set of tires is yellow sidewalls with a tan center line. At first I thought they were kind of silly looking but came to dig them after a while.

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