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Sea Otter 2008
Day Two
Genghis Kahn Video
Intro Day One
Choose Life Video

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Tara Llanes:
Determined to Recover
Finding your Green Self


New Feature:
Map your Rides!


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Cross Nationals
45 Minutes
Win or Lose
Gale Force Cross
Elements of Cross


Photos
Videos


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Got Pink?
Speaking With:
Magnus Bäckstedt
Wounded Warrior Project:
Phoenix to Vegas
Grow Your Own Bike?
Young Mechanics
Speaking with:
Shonny Vanlandingham
Stories From the Road:
The Spinning Stars


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Interbike
Faces on the Mountain
Cross Vegas
The Showroom Floor
A Cycling Shambhala
BMC FourStroke 03
Rock & Roll Lives at Defeet
Demo Days
WTB MX Prowler Review
Interbike 2007 Intro


Photos
Videos


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Junior Development
Voices:
Benny and Christian Zenga

Green Choices
On the Soldier Ride
The Jury is Still out...



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Pedros
Faces of Pedros
Lea Davison Teaches
Kids to MTB

Women's Skills by
Alison Dunlap

Coming alive
Going Green



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Voices: Reginald Harkema
Bike The World: New York
Team Trips For Kids
The Ironclad Triathlon
The Ride of Silence
Ladies Night at R-A-B
Bike the World
Bike Polo
Get Your Friends to Ride!



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Sea Otter
Grand Theft Velo
In the Heart and Mind
of the Beast

It's All About the Wheels
A sense of Paradox
Sea Otter: Super D
What is Sea Otter?



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Which Holiday Treat
Are You?

Raisin a Comeback
Marilyn Price:
Making Trips for Kids




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2006 CX Nationals Sidelines
2006 CX Nationals Day 2
2006 CX Nationals Day I
2006 CX Nationals Intro



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Warmth Recaptured
The Road Ahead
On The Well Worn Path
Fireflies in the
Garden of Gray

A Ride With the Cannibal
Hoop Talk



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Interbike '06
Grande Finale
Innocence Lost
Outdoor Demo
and Hangover Ride

Interbike 2006 Intro



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24 Hours of Willamette
Twilight at the Velodrome



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Pedros Fest '06
The Faces of Pedros
Not-so Still of the Night
The Bold and The Vulgar
Trailing Off
Stickers, Glue, Ribbons,
Markers

Good Times in the Sky
Downhiller Hunting at Jiminy
Pedros Fest Intro 2006



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Heart Rate Monitor
Mt. Hamilton
Critical Mass
The Mountain of the Devil
Fighting for the Finish
Hey Watch Your Feet!
Special Film Pull-out
Bicycle Film Festival
Tour du Parc
The Five Boro Bike Tour
VOICES: Peter Sutherland
VOICES: Brendt Barbur
VOICES: Jacob Septimus
Stillwell Interpretive Trail
Resurrecting the Vanderbilt
Motor Parkway

Kicking it up a Notch
Bicycle Film Festival Intro
The Fat Tire Classic
The Road to Zamora
Edison, NJ Show
Carlisle, PA Show
Bike Show Intro
SLIME Torture Test
Step Away from the Lube
Energy Crisis
CX Camp for Juniors
Gear Guide: 2006
Inside the CX Nationals
Road to Nowhere
Take it Hard, Take it Easy
Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Three

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Two

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day One

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Intro

Holiday GIFT GUIDE
The Unbearable Art
of Wrenching

Tasting the Brew
A Crewman's journey
275 Miles for Youth
Letters from the Road
Patterson Pass Insurgence
The Power of Critical Mass



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Travel:



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Interbike '05/ Las Vegas
IB '05: Red Rocks Canyon
IB '05: Indoor Expo
IB '05: Lake Mead
IB '05: Outdoor Demo II
IB '05: Outdoor Demo I
IB '05: Intro



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Pedros Fest '05
Night Moves
Roughin' It!
Words With Tinker Juarez
Pedros' Faces
Jiminy Peak Free Ride
Womens' Skills Clinic
Pedros: Day One
Pedros Intro



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Chicago
Bicyclist Haven?
What's Not to Bike?
Sites @ Night



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West Coast
Cali Travel Intro
Hitting the Wall
Lake Chabot
Tour de Truckee
Ride to Skyline



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Tarmac Tacos
The New York Bike Show
The Deluge Ride
New Jersey Bike Show
Stinging the Rio
Roaring Mouse Race Series
(Spring 2005)

The Agony and Ecstacy
of Icy Rain...

Visions in Saffron
Margo Conover Speaks Out
Repurposing
The Blizzard Ride
PBBC 2005 Season Opener
26 Degrees of Separation
The Abondoned Bike
Bite My Style:
Messenger Fashion




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Death Valley:
Two Cyclists Enter

Car-Free: Kara
Car-Free: Max
And the Winner is...
Halloween in Gotham
Battling El Diablo
Interbike: The Event
Interbike: Intro
Cape May,
A Cyclist's Dream

A d'Liteful Adventure
Catching up with
the Catskill Wheelmen

BTC Daily 2004
Crashpads:
Crash and Burn?

IBEX MTB Trail [Series]
Prelude to a Champion
Rudy Project: Part Deux
Take Time to Appreciate
Stretching for a Fit Body
A Soggy 5 Island Tour
Incident Report
The Pump Showdown
Manhattan Greenway
Burley D'Lite Pre-Review
Bike Rodeo
When Polar Bears Attack
Almighty Leap Ride
Essential Cycling Toolkit
Training up! [The Series]
Selle Italia/Cannondale Ride
Wanna do a charity ride?
PBBC 2003 Season Opener
Rudy Project Eval Ride
Fixing Flats On the Go!
The Ride Dine 9.13.03
Road Riding Safety
Winter Riding Safety
Cycles Le Femme Jerseys
Helmets and Safety
The New York Bike Show

The New York State Armory on 26th and Lexington Ave in Manhattan, is a fairly traditional looking building. But, on this particular evening, its appearance shrouded by some fairly non-traditional looking people, is unquestionably gothic. Cyclists, not particularly slaves to convention, line the streets. Fire engine red hair, tribal tattoos, ZZ Top-esque beards, facial (and probably many hidden) piercings, typify the people who are all arriving on two wheels. The power of cycling resides in the community which surrounds it. Entering the dungeon-like caverns of the Armory, one overhears conversations, such as the one between a punk'd out, mohawk coiffed messenger and a burly, salt and pepper, down to the waist bearded, activist leftover from the radicals of the 60's, about how NY Trans Alt had made both their lives easier, making certain that bike access to the Brooklyn Bridge is maintained...

Inside look:
As you stroll further into the Armory, into the exhibit area, a lowrider bicycle, replete with a cylinder of swirling pink liquid mounted on its rear fender, whizzes by. You later find out that the cylinder is a bike powered blender, tied to the motion of the bike, and that the pink stuff is a made to order smoothie. This seems a fitting greeting for the show, which is itself, a tasty hodge podge of venders, manufacturers, advocacy groups, and a test ride track thrown in just for fun.
Craig Calfee and his Carbon Fiber and Bamboo bike

Sometimes an old dog can teach you some new tricks:
Stopping by the Calfee Bicycle booth our reporters experienced first hand one of Craig Calfee's newest experiments. Calfee's bamboo framed, carbon lugged roadie is a totally unique design, which makes use of an old materials in a new way. Bamboo just isn't found in anyone else's bikes.

When asked about the unique creation, Craig had this to say:
rule Reporter: How's the ride?
Craig: The word here is "Smooth". It's one of the smoothest riding bikes out there.

Reporter: What about road feel?
Craig: It's surprisingly lively. Strangely enough, it's not wooden like some carbon fiber can be. There's an appropriate amount of road feel but the ride is super smooth.

Reporter: Do you find that the oversized tubes have aerodynamic drawbacks?
Craig: There are slight drawbacks to the fatter tubes but, in general, the rider that's going to buy this bike isn't looking to shave a two seconds on a 180k event.

Reporter: Where did you get the idea to use bamboo?
Craig: My dog gave it to me! I was playing fetch with my dog on the beach. He brought back a piece of bamboo and I was swinging him around with it and I noticed that "Hey, bamboo is strong stuff and it didn't break easy".

Reporter: Good dog! Thanks Craig.
Craig: Thank you!
rule

Gold platted recumbent bike

The taste of the NY Bike Show:
Scattered about the show were the usual "Off-center" crowd. Chromed-out, gold plated bikes and tricked out Roadsters littered the aisles. Independently produced BMX's added to the mix to make for an impressive, interesting amalgam of two wheeled metal. The strong contrast between these - some of the more traditional names such as Giant Bike, or White Lightning - and high end offerings such as Kestrel, Calfee and Topolino - made for an elegant "7 Course meal for the eyes." Top it all off with a dolop of bike advocacy and a splash of charitable groups such as Trans Alt, Time's up!, Tour de Cure, Braking the Cycle and Bike for SCORES and you have a perfect mix.


Paul Falvey, Mike Vitti, and Christine from C.L.I.M.B.

A run in with the locals...
Winding along through the last corridor of the show our roving reporters ran into Paul Falvey of C.L.I.M.B decked out in his Hawiian shirt. After speaking for a while they were joined by Michael (C.L.I.M.B.'s Stillwell Trail Steward) and Christine (the Editor of C.L.I.M.B.'s newsletter). Michael had some really great news about government plans for some new trails and bike paths throughout Nassau and Suffolk County. Look for more details on these pages coming soon!
Blake and Eric from Global Impact Tours

Beer and Charity:
The Brooklyn Brewery was on hand dispensing one of the world's favorite energy drinks, along with an assortment of soft drinks. Sharing the Brooklyn Brewery booth were reps from the two charity rides that Brooklyn Beer sponsors each year, The first is the "Braking the Cycle" AIDS ride, the second is the "Bike for SCORES" ride. The 275 Mile rides from Maryland to New York share a similar route and both cover 5 States in 3 Days. Eric and Blake from Global Impact Productions (The organizers of the two events) were accompanied by a cast of volunteers describing the rides and hawking beer. Needless to say, their booth was a popular one.

Steve Faust from the New York Bicycle Coalition

Declaration of Independence: A few words from Steve Faust - New York Bicycle Coalition
"The public highways are for the safe movement of people and goods, and though motor vehicles may be common and make up a large part of that movement, it should be possible for anyone to travel across this country under their own power, on foot or bicycle, without undue restriction. Pedestrians and bicycles are traffic...

Cyclists require adequate access to all roads in order to get from where they are to where they want to be. It is not possible to create a system of entirely separate off road paths, therefore cyclists will have to share the motorway roads. Separate but equal does not work.

Bridges in particular are either gateways or corked bottlenecks. All traffic funnels to a bridge and then fans out again on the other side. There are no alternatives. Some level of crossing must be maintained for non-motorized traffic."

The Wrap Up:
To summarize, the New York Bike Show experience would have to be called 'eclectic.' Everything that is New York is there, edginess, attitude, innovation and extreme bike tricks. Messengers, advocates, manufacturers, and the media were all on hand. It was about the people. it was "Not about the Bike."

The New York Bike Show

The New York State Armory on 26th and Lexington Ave in Manhattan, is a fairly traditional looking building. But, on this particular evening, its appearance shrouded by some fairly non-traditional looking people, is unquestionably gothic. Cyclists, not particularly slaves to convention, line the streets. Fire engine red hair, tribal tattoos, ZZ Top-esque beards, facial (and probably many hidden) piercings, typify the people who are all arriving on two wheels. The power of cycling resides in the community which surrounds it. Entering the dungeon-like caverns of the Armory, one overhears conversations, such as the one between a punk'd out, mohawk coiffed messenger and a burly, salt and pepper, down to the waist bearded, activist leftover from the radicals of the 60's, about how NY Trans Alt had made both their lives easier, making certain that bike access to the Brooklyn Bridge is maintained...

Inside look:
As you stroll further into the Armory, into the exhibit area, a lowrider bicycle, replete with a cylinder of swirling pink liquid mounted on its rear fender, whizzes by. You later find out that the cylinder is a bike powered blender, tied to the motion of the bike, and that the pink stuff is a made to order smoothie. This seems a fitting greeting for the show, which is itself, a tasty hodge podge of venders, manufacturers, advocacy groups, and a test ride track thrown in just for fun.
Craig Calfee and his Carbon Fiber and Bamboo bike

Sometimes an old dog can teach you some new tricks:
Stopping by the Calfee Bicycle booth our reporters experienced first hand one of Craig Calfee's newest experiments. Calfee's bamboo framed, carbon lugged roadie is a totally unique design, which makes use of an old materials in a new way. Bamboo just isn't found in anyone else's bikes.

When asked about the unique creation, Craig had this to say:
rule Reporter: How's the ride?
Craig: The word here is "Smooth". It's one of the smoothest riding bikes out there.

Reporter: What about road feel?
Craig: It's surprisingly lively. Strangely enough, it's not wooden like some carbon fiber can be. There's an appropriate amount of road feel but the ride is super smooth.

Reporter: Do you find that the oversized tubes have aerodynamic drawbacks?
Craig: There are slight drawbacks to the fatter tubes but, in general, the rider that's going to buy this bike isn't looking to shave a two seconds on a 180k event.

Reporter: Where did you get the idea to use bamboo?
Craig: My dog gave it to me! I was playing fetch with my dog on the beach. He brought back a piece of bamboo and I was swinging him around with it and I noticed that "Hey, bamboo is strong stuff and it didn't break easy".

Reporter: Good dog! Thanks Craig.
Craig: Thank you!
rule

Gold platted recumbent bike

The taste of the NY Bike Show:
Scattered about the show were the usual "Off-center" crowd. Chromed-out, gold plated bikes and tricked out Roadsters littered the aisles. Independently produced BMX's added to the mix to make for an impressive, interesting amalgam of two wheeled metal. The strong contrast between these - some of the more traditional names such as Giant Bike, or White Lightning - and high end offerings such as Kestrel, Calfee and Topolino - made for an elegant "7 Course meal for the eyes." Top it all off with a dolop of bike advocacy and a splash of charitable groups such as Trans Alt, Time's up!, Tour de Cure, Braking the Cycle and Bike for SCORES and you have a perfect mix.


Paul Falvey, Mike Vitti, and Christine from C.L.I.M.B.

A run in with the locals...
Winding along through the last corridor of the show our roving reporters ran into Paul Falvey of C.L.I.M.B decked out in his Hawiian shirt. After speaking for a while they were joined by Michael (C.L.I.M.B.'s Stillwell Trail Steward) and Christine (the Editor of C.L.I.M.B.'s newsletter). Michael had some really great news about government plans for some new trails and bike paths throughout Nassau and Suffolk County. Look for more details on these pages coming soon!
Blake and Eric from Global Impact Tours

Beer and Charity:
The Brooklyn Brewery was on hand dispensing one of the world's favorite energy drinks, along with an assortment of soft drinks. Sharing the Brooklyn Brewery booth were reps from the two charity rides that Brooklyn Beer sponsors each year, The first is the "Braking the Cycle" AIDS ride, the second is the "Bike for SCORES" ride. The 275 Mile rides from Maryland to New York share a similar route and both cover 5 States in 3 Days. Eric and Blake from Global Impact Productions (The organizers of the two events) were accompanied by a cast of volunteers describing the rides and hawking beer. Needless to say, their booth was a popular one.

Steve Faust from the New York Bicycle Coalition

Declaration of Independence: A few words from Steve Faust - New York Bicycle Coalition
"The public highways are for the safe movement of people and goods, and though motor vehicles may be common and make up a large part of that movement, it should be possible for anyone to travel across this country under their own power, on foot or bicycle, without undue restriction. Pedestrians and bicycles are traffic...

Cyclists require adequate access to all roads in order to get from where they are to where they want to be. It is not possible to create a system of entirely separate off road paths, therefore cyclists will have to share the motorway roads. Separate but equal does not work.

Bridges in particular are either gateways or corked bottlenecks. All traffic funnels to a bridge and then fans out again on the other side. There are no alternatives. Some level of crossing must be maintained for non-motorized traffic."

The Wrap Up:
To summarize, the New York Bike Show experience would have to be called 'eclectic.' Everything that is New York is there, edginess, attitude, innovation and extreme bike tricks. Messengers, advocates, manufacturers, and the media were all on hand. It was about the people. it was "Not about the Bike."

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