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By Neil Anderson
By Neil Anderson
By Phil Angelillo
By Marg Archibald
By Lance Armstrong with Sally Jenkins
By Michael Barry
By Simon Burney
By Dan Carlinsky and David Heim
By Dirk Friel and Wes Hudson
By Raul Guisado
By David Herlihy
By Tim Krabbé
By Floyd Landis with Lauren Mooney
By Mike Magnuson


By Graeme Obree
By JP Partland
By JP Partland
By Thomas Prehn
By Andy Pruit
By Saul Raisin with Dave Shields
By Michael J. Ross M.D.
By Michael J. Ross M.D.
By Monique Ryan
Edited by: Erich Schweikher
By Dave Shields
By Dave Shields
By Stevie Smith By Lennard Zinn


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Movies:
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Workouts in a Binder:
For Indoor Cycling
Author:
Dirk Friel and Wes Hobson


Publisher:
Velo Press


Genre:
Training and Fitness

Overall out of 10: 9.7
Reviewed by Garuch


Click here
to buy now!

Workouts in a Binder if applied honestly, to your indoor cycling training efforts will absolutely turn you out in better shape and a stronger rider than what you were when you ended last season... unless you die first!

Often when I read various training manuals and articles in other bicycling magazines, I kind of felt, "Ok, yeah, that sounds good but first I will have to sit down and write out the whole workout in shorthand." I always felt that there had to be some sort of abbreviated notes that I could actually use when I did the work out. Who can read an entire article while pedaling furiously?

This is the first thing that Workouts in A Binder fixes. All the specifications and instructions are shorthanded for relatively easy understanding and legibility while pedaling. Of course, that is once you read through and memorize the shorthand.

Workouts in a binder, by Dirk Friel

The second thing addressed are the sweat issues. Have you ever seen a magazine page after a deluge of salty sweat gets at it? It is not pretty and it is even less legible. Velo Press solves this issue by printing the book on cover plate thickness paper, and then coating the entire book and pages in plastic film rendering it impervious to perspiration.

Oh yeah, perspiration, get ready to do a whole lot of that. No Really I mean a whole bucketful or maybe even two. I am a decent recreational rider. I can keep up with the wolves for a while and I can do a decent century in acceptable time. I consider myself reasonably accomplished. It took me two and a half weeks to work up to the first week of the "five week cycling preparation plan." This book will teach you pain! You gotta love it.

The first 25 pages are regular reading, but also reference for the completion of the workouts which follow in the next 60 pages or so. Given delightful names, such as "rolling hills," or "Long Climbs,' or "Spin-Ups," these are one page torture-fests. Do not attempt these work outs at home!

All kidding aside these are serious workouts. This book is designed to make you a stronger, perhaps even competitive rider. The $29.95 price tag printed on the back cover does not even begin to cover the value of this workout campaign. Ranging from 30 minutes to practically two hours, the sessions make you pay for this book every time you sit on your trainer. The rewards you yield are its way of paying you back.

Your workouts are paced in intervals, these intervals are at described Perceived Effort Levels, also described are the power outputs for those of you well heeled enough to afford such systems. For the rest of us the "Perceived Effort" and "Heart Rate Zones" give you a good basis for estimating the work load.

All I can really say is that this publication has taken Friel and Velo Press another step further in their delivery of excellent workout and training publications. If you use this book consistently to define your indoor work out efforts, you will emerge in the spring as one of the wolves. Your fellow riders will wonder what put the starch in your sails as they try to hook onto your wheel - probably unsuccessfully!


Workouts in a Binder:
For Indoor Cycling
Author:
Dirk Friel and Wes Hobson


Publisher:
Velo Press


Genre:
Training and Fitness

Overall out of 10: 9.7
Reviewed by Garuch


Click here
to buy now!

Workouts in a Binder if applied honestly, to your indoor cycling training efforts will absolutely turn you out in better shape and a stronger rider than what you were when you ended last season... unless you die first!

Often when I read various training manuals and articles in other bicycling magazines, I kind of felt, "Ok, yeah, that sounds good but first I will have to sit down and write out the whole workout in shorthand." I always felt that there had to be some sort of abbreviated notes that I could actually use when I did the work out. Who can read an entire article while pedaling furiously?

This is the first thing that Workouts in A Binder fixes. All the specifications and instructions are shorthanded for relatively easy understanding and legibility while pedaling. Of course, that is once you read through and memorize the shorthand.

Workouts in a binder, by Dirk Friel

The second thing addressed are the sweat issues. Have you ever seen a magazine page after a deluge of salty sweat gets at it? It is not pretty and it is even less legible. Velo Press solves this issue by printing the book on cover plate thickness paper, and then coating the entire book and pages in plastic film rendering it impervious to perspiration.

Oh yeah, perspiration, get ready to do a whole lot of that. No Really I mean a whole bucketful or maybe even two. I am a decent recreational rider. I can keep up with the wolves for a while and I can do a decent century in acceptable time. I consider myself reasonably accomplished. It took me two and a half weeks to work up to the first week of the "five week cycling preparation plan." This book will teach you pain! You gotta love it.

The first 25 pages are regular reading, but also reference for the completion of the workouts which follow in the next 60 pages or so. Given delightful names, such as "rolling hills," or "Long Climbs,' or "Spin-Ups," these are one page torture-fests. Do not attempt these work outs at home!

All kidding aside these are serious workouts. This book is designed to make you a stronger, perhaps even competitive rider. The $29.95 price tag printed on the back cover does not even begin to cover the value of this workout campaign. Ranging from 30 minutes to practically two hours, the sessions make you pay for this book every time you sit on your trainer. The rewards you yield are its way of paying you back.

Your workouts are paced in intervals, these intervals are at described Perceived Effort Levels, also described are the power outputs for those of you well heeled enough to afford such systems. For the rest of us the "Perceived Effort" and "Heart Rate Zones" give you a good basis for estimating the work load.

All I can really say is that this publication has taken Friel and Velo Press another step further in their delivery of excellent workout and training publications. If you use this book consistently to define your indoor work out efforts, you will emerge in the spring as one of the wolves. Your fellow riders will wonder what put the starch in your sails as they try to hook onto your wheel - probably unsuccessfully!


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